Skip to main content

About your Search

20121101
20121130
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
not basically in iowa. >> reporter: matters how california looks and how nevada and virginia looks. >> right. >> it is difficult for mitt romney to say this economy is in free fall, it is not. unemployment rate here is pretty darn good, 5.2%, the lowest in the country. the president won by ten points here in the last election, my question for you, sue, why isn't he locking it down? >> you know, we actually feel like we're locking it down, we have been locking it down for two years. >> i think she is selling you something, they are not locking it down. >> reporter: we found plenty of people in iowa who are not convinced. >> we can't sustain itself, you hear these big huge empires, countries are going bankrupt. it will be us. >> reporter: he doesn't think he has plans for the deficit. >> i don't think either side has plans for it. it becomes the lesser of two evils. >> reporter: kevin says he can't plan a 2013 budget and certainly can't hire. >> our customers are just slow. they're just not ordering. >> reporter: he says like him, they're frozen, waiting to see who wins the election and whethe
? >> you know, they definitely want him, you can see that. in fact, senator feinstein of california, who is head of the senate intelligence committee, wants him, is hoping that he would testify as early as friday. he was scheduled to testify this week. in fact, i believe it was thursday. that's not happening. but, you know, youf got two things. one is they believe that the information that he has, obviously, would be valuable. and, in fact, in some cases they would say crucial. the other thing is there are allegations by some republicans that the timing of his stepping down and all of his scandal is connected to the investigation. now that is surmisal on their part. that's allegations. there certainly is a lot of interest in getting him up there to tell what he knows. >> jill dougherty, reporting live for us this morning. >>> it has been eight months since the president has held a news conference at the white house. as you know, a lot has happened since then. attacks in benghazi, re-election, fiscal cliff we're getting very close to. white house correspondent brianna keilar joins us now.
people into jobs that are opening. there's a reason san diego, california is the human genome capital of the world. same deal, public, private, foundations, people working together. ever since the tea party took over the republican party -- >> boo! >> ever since the tea party took over the republican party, they say it's my way or the highway, we're right all the time. they've beat the distinguished republican senator from indiana, richard luger, their most important foreign policy spokesperson because he was attacked by his opponent for cooperating with president obama on national security. they're nominee actually said, i couldn't make this up, that his happiest day was when he was imposing his opinion on someone else and he wanted the people to send him to washington, so that he could have more partisanship in washington, d.c. now if you want it, you can have it. the people of indiana don't want it, congressman joe donnelly his opponent was ahead by 11 points in the most recent polls, you're going to change that. but it will all be for naught if you reward him by not electing presi
're not competitive. in huge areas of the country. some of the biggest states, california, new york, illinois, we're not competing anymore. we don't even advertise there. once you give up those electoral votes, we're getting down to where we have to -- we're in ohio every time, we have to win florida and ohio every time. what we need to do is be competitive throughout the united states, and i think young people want a less aggressive foreign policy. they don't want to put people in 20 years in jail for marijuana use or nonviolent crimes. and i think they want a little bit different approach to immigration. >> okay. you say you want to be part of the national dialogue. perhaps a bigger part of it. we shall see. senator rand paul, thank you very much, we appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> and now to the face to face meeting today between u.n. ambassador susan rice and her chief republican critics. ambassador rice on capitol hill, just this morning, to meet with the people you see on your screen here. you have senator john mccain, lindsey graham, kelly ayotte. she went to address concerns they have ov
in california. what happens if the court decides not to hear this one? >> it is tricky, don, because first of all, nothing is simple to the supreme court. it depends what the court does. the court could formally reject that case, which means the lower court ruling stands, so for proposition 8, a federal appeals court already ruled that the ban which passed as a referendum by the way is unconstitutional. so the supreme court rejecting the case would basically make same sex marriage legal again in california. this is another big point, though, the supreme court could simply decide just to sit on the case, not hear it this term, not reject it either and that basically would put the decision off to a later date. and then at that time, california would just sort of be stuck in a legal limbo until the court makes a decision. >> all right. so we'll just basically what you're saying we'll have to wait and see what happens on this one, right? >> yeah. >> several cases deal with doma, the defense of marriage act, is what we're talking about. what is at the heart of those cases and how likely is it t
of rain over the next five days. northern california and southern oregon are expected to bear the brunt of the storms. >>> i'm dr. sanjay gupta. this week on "the next list" meet max little a math whiz and innovator with a surprising goal. >> my name is max little. i'm aiming to screen the population for parkinson's disease using voice. >> reporter: max little has a bold idea. what if doctors could detect parkinson's disease simply by the sound of your voice? max little is close to proving just that. he says one simple voice test can determine if someone has parkinson's disease. all you need is a telephone. >> we've got an ultra low cost way of detecting the disease. >> reporter: watch how max little's surprising idea is taking shape sunday on "the next list." [ male announcer ] this december, remember -- you can stay in and share something... or you can get out there and actually share something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on. this is the pursuit of perfection. the lexus december to remember sales event is on. social security are just numbers thinkin a budget.d..
well in places like california where people drive long distances and where a lot of people are very concerned about the environment and want to drive hybrid or electric vehicles. so even though they haven't been so strong throughout the rest of the country, companies like general motors continue to push ahead with these vehicles. here is their newest introduction, which will be on the market in 2014. only available for sale in california and in oregon initially. this is the chevy spark. it is an all electric vehicle that will get somewhere south of 100 miles on a full charge. what's really cool about this vehicle is you'll be able to charge it up to 80% capacity in just 20 minutes. that is a challenge, though, getting the rest of america outside of places like california to buy these vehicles. listen to what gm had to say about that. >> the key now is to sell these vehicles in the same kind of quantity in st. louis and des moines, in the heartland of america, if you will. when you drive an electric car, we're not going to sell this thing on the environmental aspect aspects. these ca
wade into this issue, one of the cases they can hear is the appeal of california's prop 8, the ballot metro that bans same-sex marriage. what's at stake? is. >> the first word is if, and so you have to reiterate that we don't know if that decision to take up this case is going to come today or even this term. it could and it might, and there's speculation that it will, but if the supreme court has anything, it's unpredictable, and on the proposition 8 case, there's a specific question. can a state referendum abolish same-sex marriage after the courts have already ruled that it's legal? remember, that statewide vote to ban gay marriage was in response to courts in california legalizing same-sex marriage. assuming the supreme court sticks to this specific issue, it would have big implications for, say, california, but wouldn't necessarily be a sweeping ruling that would impact same-sex marriage all over the country. >> joe, talk a little bit about these cases that are challenging the federal defense of marriage act, known as doma. this is essentially the law that defines marriage betwee
uppoet and hopeful. the reason why is that it works here in the battleground state of california because the romney campaign wants to reach out to the independents. a third of the voters here in colorado are registered independents. and so the last thing the romney campaign wants, and that the obama campaign wants is for those independents to throw up their hands and say i hate both these guys. i'm just going to stay home and not vote. whose coming out so far? colorado secretary of state says 1.6 million people have already cast early votes. and leading right now are registered republicans, by about 35,000 votes. so the republicans here in colorado say they have the ground game, they have the edge. they have the energy. and they believe this the obama win in colorado in 2008 was just a one off that, romney camp will take the stage. in a denver post poll, they say, hey, we have the edge. it appears that obama is slightly leading from according to that poll. having talked to people here, it is simply too close to call. reading the tea leaves, woe'll just have to wait and see what happens o
and massachusetts into play. democrats are trying hard to unseat gop incumbents in blue states like california, new york, and illinois. and could see gains in maryland and florida. so why do these house races matter? members of congress will have to make big decisions in the coming month. chief among them, reaching a deal to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff, a series of tax increases and spending cuts set to take effect next year. >> the decisions confronting congress over the next four months are bigger than i think most of us have seen in our lifetime, at least on the fiscal matter. >> it's not just the fiscal cliff. >> most people think we need fundamental tax reform, cuts in spending and entitlement reform. there's no indication the new congress will be willing to do that either short-term in the lame duck or longer term. >> so the forecast for the next congress, more of the same. athena jones, cnn, washington. >> and we have more on the race to the white house. first lady michelle obama is expected to speak any minute now in southern ohio. you're looking at live pictures right now. looks like
of los angeles, not your home state of california, but still, you're there. i want to talk to you about the lines. these lines of early voters we're seeing today, looks like winding around street corners, you have people in southern florida, casting ballots, waiting for hours to do so, some from what i've heard, some are just walking away, giving up. question to you is how confident are you by the time the polls close tomorrow that everyone who wants to vote can? >> well, as you know, the governor, governor scott and the legislature reduced early voting by six days. they even fought in court the opportunity to extend voting hours at a polling place where there had been a bomb threat. our hope is that people will go out and vote. i can tell you there are 125 offices. we have been working two years here in florida. >> what is your confidence level? are you confident that everyone who wants to vote will be voting? >> i'm confident that we'll make every effort to get them out to vote. you talked about the enthusiasm gap. i haven't seen it. i didn't see it in tampa. i haven't seen it in miam
's a reality. humboldt state university in northern california is holding interdisciplinary studies right now focusing on medical marijuana. it's being run by different professors and lecturers. medical marijuana's a hot topic now as more states allow its use and two states, as you know, they've approved the drug for recreational use. so here's a question -- would you let a first or second grader or any child use medical marijuana? some family members in oregon say yes. 7-year-old any kyla comstock has leukemia. she's a registered medical marijuana patient. her mom gives her the drug every day. not surprisingly, there are some, including her father, who have concerns about this. after all, she's 7 years old. dr. sanjay gupta joins us with more. and we wanted to get your opinion on this. >> well, i mean, the first question a lot of people ask is, is this even safe to do. and this ends up being the crux of questions surrounding marijuana. what is hard from a purely scientific standpoint is that it's an illegal drug in the united states. so it's hard to do studies on a drug that's illegal. you o
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)